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Apr

For Photogs: Taking Family Photos with Paparazzi

Sometimes during a wedding when I am trying to take the posed family photos, the family members end up looking at everyone else taking photos of them and not at my camera. It makes family photos take even longer and can be frustrating. Have you been in this kind of a situation? What do you do? 
 
Thanks, Frustrated
 
 
Yes, yes and YES! I have been in that situation more times then I can remember and get questions often from other photographers about this! For me, there are really two main challenges when other guests are taking photos of the family you are trying to pose and photograph. First, is the very challange you pointed out - the family members start looking around at other cameras, then back at my camera, then back quickly at all the other guests taking photos, and so on. It makes for an awkward family photo when only some of the family members are looking at my camera and then others in different directions. The second challenge is when the family is constantly blinking because of guests' camera flashes going off. We've all been there, right?! It can take so much longer to complete family photos when the photo has to be taken again and again to account for family members blinking from guests' camera flashes. 
 
That being said, there are some things that I do on a regular basis to avoid these two things from happening and help me efficiently and quickly complete family photos. 
 
One thing I might do if it's a key family photo (like one whole side of a family) and lots of guest are trying to photograph it, I will stand off to the side for about 15 seconds and direct the family to look at the guests taking photos. I will then step back in front of the group and direct the family to only look at my camera now. I have found this is much more effective then trying to have all the guests hold off on photographing the family. Not only do guests step away after taking a photo so that my camera is the only one taking photos, but the guests are so grateful they were able to get a quick photo on their device. If guests still continue to take photos of the group and it is effecting where the group is looking or blinking, I will stop taking photos and turn completely around to the guests and ask them to refrain from taking photos until I am done. If time is limited and there is no time for me to stand off to the side or LOTS of guests are photographing the family photos I will usually ask them to refrain right off the bat and explain that them taking photos is interfering with my photographing the family. Sometimes at this point my couple will echo what I have said to specific guests which can help as well!  
 
Your couples have hired you to photograph their entire day to the best of your ability, including the family photos. So remember to be assertive when you need to be! I hope this is helpful and please know that you are definitely not the only one that finds themself in this situation wedding after wedding!

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Apr

Mentoring Sessions & Workshop

We hear from so many photographers who are frustrated with the growth, or lack there of, in their businesses. They are struggling to figure out how to brand, market, and price themselves. They aren't sure who their ideal client is or should be and what their client experience should look like. They don't have a clear direction for their photography business and aren't sure what to do next. And when asking them what they are going to do about it, typically they don't know. Or they are doing nothing for the time being. 
 
But change requires action. It requires doing things and doing things differently. It means taking a step in the right direction for their business, and for some photographers this means attending a workshop or signing up for an intensive mentoring session. If this is you, we have TWO mentoring sessions left for this spring! For more details regarding our mentoring sessions, CLICK HERE. We asked past mentee Anne for her feedback on her mentoring session and this is what she had to say:

Our workshop this year is now being planned for this fall and we can't wait for all thats being planned for it! It will take place at an awesome venue in Trumbull CT! We are excited to share the details about it next month. Please CONTACT US HERE if you are interested in being on the email list to be contacted first when the workshop details are announced!

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Mar

For Photogs: Asking Why

As business owners one of the most important questions we can ask ourselves is WHY? Cause lets be honest, we ask this question of our mentors and people we admire in the industry when trying to understand their businesses, but we often forget to ask ourselves this question.  
 
When preparing for a mentoring session with a photographer, Chris and I do a deep dive analysis of the photographer's business. Part of this usually includes writing down questions regarding why the photographer does things a certain way, operates their business using a specific process, and the thinking/reasoning behind an aspect of their business. While many times they have an answer that is a well informed intentional reason, a lot of the time if we are confused about why they do things a certain way, they may also be. Here are the top five answers we get when we ask WHY that raise a concerning flag: 
 
I don't know 
• I've always done it that way 
• Other people do it  
• I don't know how to do it any other way 
• I didn't know that's what I was doing
 
 
As business owners it is our responsibility to know why we make the decisions we make for our business and do things the way we do. "I don't know" is one of the scariest answers because if the photographer who owns the business doesn't know why they do x,y,z then who does?! Running a business from a place of blind emotion is like a sailboat at sea with no rutter. The boat will go wherever the tide takes it with no clear reasoning, direction or purpose. Surely this boat will eventually run into the ground. For example, the question "why do you charge what you do for your services?" shouldn't be answered with "I don't know." Strong business are built on a foundation of informed processes and decisions that work best for that business. 
 
If you are doing things simply and only because you have always done it that way, I can guarantee you are not growing as a business owner. Significant or forward movement never came from comfort zones, the worn path, or doing things the same way time and time again just because. 
 
Doing what everyone else is doing is very risky. Answering the question "why are you hosting a workshop?" or "why are you offering discounts?" with "Because everyone else is" is concerning. Making decisions for your business based on trends and what works for other people really isn't a smart place to run a business from. Because let's be honest, trends change and what works for them may not be best for you and your business.  
 
The heartbeat of WHY you do what you do within your business should come from a place of clearly knowing your own business, goals, intentions, and motivations.

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Feb

5 Tips To Accomplishing Goals

It's that time of year when most of the goals we set for ourselves for the year have probably not been crossed off our To Do list and are still waiting to be achieved. And if they all have been achieved already, then you need to dream bigger scarier dreams! And it's right about now that I wish there was a perfectly crafted turn key way to guarantee getting things done and accomplish all that we have set out for ourselves. Wouldn't that be great? While there is no turn key, there are five main things that have really helped me in accomplishing goals and getting stuff done that I want to share with you! Let's jump right into them: 
 
Write them down. Chris has probably said the phrase to me, "you don't know where you're going if you don't know where you're going" literally a million times. And he is so right. It may seem like an obvious or simple thing to do, but clearly identifying your goals and what needs to be done is going to help you 1) know what you are working towards and 2) identify what you need to do to get there. And I don't just mean have your goals loosely floating around your head somewhere between your grocery list and the time of your dentist appointment. I mean pen to paper, clearly writing out specifically what your goals are. I often do a huge brain dump of all the things I want to get done (for the year, that month, for the day) and then prioritize them. 
 
Keep them visible. Now that you have them all written out, keep them out. Have your goals sitting on your desk or hanging from your mirror where you can constantly see them. This way you will see them each day and remind yourself what you are working towards. Writing them in a journal and then tucking that away until the end of the year to see if you (*fingers crossed*) hopefully can check off some of the goals that you (*fingers crossed*) remembered, isn't going to be helpful. Chris was the one that truly taught me the power of this very early on. And I will let you in on a little secret... Chris used to keep a little laminated (yes, laminated!) card with his goals in his wallet. So each time he took something out of his wallet, there were his goals demanding not to be forgotten and calling for action. Each time Chris would achieve a goal he would take a marker and cross it off on the card. True story. At first I honestly thought he was a complete (yet adorable :) ) dork for doing this, but let me tell you, Chris has achieved more of what he has set out to do for himself more then anyone I know! So write down your goals and keep them visible. 
 
Identify smaller steps. As great as it is to have a list of goals, I have found that they just stay a list of things that hoooopefully will happen UNLESS I identify what needs to be done for each to be accomplished. This means taking each goal and writing out the steps that need to take place in order for me to move forward in the direction of achieving them. Notice I didn't say what steps I need to take to achieve the goal. While in some cases it may be as cut and dry as simply doing XYZ and the goal will be achieved, a majority of goals don't have clear 1,2,3 steps. So I encourage you to write out ACTION steps that you believe will help you move forward toward your goal, even if it's just a little. Maybe a step is reaching out to a colleague or emailing a question to a vendor. Goals are often much less daunting when we identify smaller steps to take for each. And then the key to this tip is taking action and actually doing these steps you identified!  
 
Assign timing to them. Having "this year" be the timing for when you want to achieve your goal is often much less motivating and can lead us to put off taking action towards that goal. Simply put, it can encourage procrastination. In February we may feel like we have lots and lots of time to achieve that goal, but how many times has December rolled around and we realize we haven't done anything to work towards it. Having timing associated with goals and the steps to be taken helps us 1) prioritize what to do first, 2) allocate our resources and 3) adds a sense of urgency in achieving it. 
 
Have someone hold you accountable. This is a big one and something we can so easily forget as business owners. Many of us are so used to juggling everything with our business and doing it all ourselves, that we forget the importance of accountability. While Chris and I are in constant communication about the status of things, we sit down every other week together to go through our goals and share updates with one another around the business. It's a status meetings of sorts. Some of the projects Chris isn't involved with at all, but just vocalizing to him the progress or lack there of is helpful for me. I share with him some of the obstacles I am facing and he can encourage me and sometimes provide suggestions about what to do. I know not everyone works with someone else in their business, but even if you have a colleague or friend that can hear your goals and what you are working towards, it can be super powerful. If you can both help one another in getting that much closer to accomplishing what you set out to do that's even better! I know it may not be easy, but it's important to share your goals, dreams, and action plan with someone so they can encourage and hold you accountable. 
 
 
With all the snow on the ground right now, I am day dreaming about this sunny shoot in Santa Barbara CA... I think we need to plan a west coast visit again sooner then later! Adding that to my goals and making the timing ASAP! ;)

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Jan

Q&A: What Should I Share On My Blog?

I think anyone who has a blog has probably asked or wondered about these questions at some point... I know I certainly have! What should I share on my blog? Are there things I should or shouldn't share? How do I know if I am sharing too much? These are such great questions and important things to think about. 
 
There is no clear answer, but what IS clear is that there is no right or wrong answer! :) Here are three things to ask yourself as you think about these questions and write for your blog: 
 
What are you using your blog for. Whether you are a photographer or another small business owner or just have a blog for personal use, it's important to identify what the purpose of your blog is. Is it the space that you showcase your recent photography work? Is it an educational tool where you post information and content to help others? Are you using it to share more about yourself and your story to inspire and encourage others? Knowing what you are using your blog for will have shape the kinds of content you will post on it. And this purpose will help you filter through the things you will/will not share in that space. 
 
I primarily use my blog as a tool for people to get more about me and my photography. This is why I share on my blog about my son and husband, failed cooking attempts, the last wedding we captured, frequently asked questions from other photographers and tips/tricks to shooting. I aim for a balance between posting personal, business, and educational content but let whatever I have going on in my life help determine the frequency of each. For example, when we are in the thick of wedding season, I post more weddings and share more of my couple's love stories. 
 
Once it's out there, it's out there. I know you already know this and have probably heard this a thousand times when it comes to the internet and social media, but it's worth repeating and reminding ourselves! I think when we write posts for our blogs, especially ones that are maybe more on the personal side, we forget that once we post them people will actually see and read them. After all, that's what we hope for! Maybe its five people, maybe it's five thousand. Just know that when it's out there it's out there for people to see, so deciding on boundaries and thinking about what you want to share is important.  
 
Before I publish each post on my blog I do what I like to call the "Super Bowl test." It's not as cool and action packed as it sounds, but it helps me! I ask myself, would I be willing to stand in the center of the field at the Super Bowl before Beyoncé performs at half time, with the stands filled and it being broadcasted live on TV to the thousands at home watching for the game or just the commercials (I am a self-proclaimed commercial watcher) and say out loud to everyone what I just wrote. Would I be willing to share with thousands of strangers and also people I know what I am about to post? Am I comfortable with sharing with everyone what I wrote? Only if the answer is "yes" do I publish the blog post. If I'm not sure or think I probably wouldn't, I revise the post or decide not to post it. That's my super not-so-fancy gut test. Now this isn't to say I am not vulnerable in sharing things, but it's worth asking myself this gut check question each time. 
 
Setting boundaries. Thinking about and deciding on boundaries around what you share on your blog is really important. You may decide that you will have very few if any boundaries. Or on the other hand, you may decide you will have clear conservative boundaries and will just post photos from your weddings/shoots. Maybe you choose not to post any photos of your children and family, maybe you do. Maybe you decide not to most any posts about your personal life, but just share educational content. Whatever you decide, know that there is no right or wrong answer. You should decide what you are comfortable with sharing and what works best for you and the objectives you have for your blog. And you can change your boundaries if you choose, just know like I said above that once it's out there, it's out there! For me, I decided a long ago to share my photography, educational content, as well as personal posts. There are some things I choose not to go into great detail about and keep more private, just as many of us do in our lives, but do share things about myself and my life as a way for people to get to know me better!

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